University of Minnesota
Department of French & Italian
frit@umn.edu
612-624-4308


Department of French & Italian home page

Placement & Transferring Credits

Placement
       French Placement
       Italian Placement
Transfer and Study Abroad Credits

Placement

All language testing should be completed before the beginning of the semester.

Placement in the appropriate course will help you make the most of your learning experience.

Italian

1000 level Courses, 3015
Please contact :
  • Carlotta Dradi-Bower, drad0001@umn.edu, Coordinator, First-year Italian and Director of Italian Language Instruction
  • Kathleen Rider, ride0002@umn.edu, Coordinator, Second-year Italian

French

Entering students may have a variety of backgrounds, from traditional high school instruction to French immersion programs, speaking the language at home, attending French-speaking schools abroad, or being native speakers. In what follows, please follow the instructions that pertain to your background.

Students who enter the University of Minnesota after studying in a traditional high school French program or after completing first, second, or third-semester French at another university should refer to the language testing information available on the CLA Language Testing website.

If these students have further questions regarding what classes to register for, they should contact:

Students who have completed fourth-semester French at another university should take the LPE (https://langtest.umn.edu/lpe/what ).

Students who have completed more than four semesters of French at another university should contact the DUS in French about placement.

A certain number of students enter the University with a background in French different from the traditional French instruction in the US. These students may be coming out of French Immersion programs, where the language has been integrated into their education throughout grades 1–8, or they may be “heritage speakers,” students who grew up speaking French at home but did not learn the formal grammar/orthography of the language at school. Other students may have lived abroad for a period and attended French-speaking schools at that time. A few students will be native speakers of French who attended French-speaking schools through high school.

French immersion students, heritage speakers, and students who have attended French-speaking schools while living abroad should take the LPE (https://langtest.umn.edu/lpe/what ). These students should not take the EPT, which is designed for students following traditional language courses and can turn up erroneous results for those with non-traditional backgrounds.

If you pass the LPE, you may enroll in French 3015. However, you may not need French 3015 either. To determine whether or not you need French 3015, please contact the Department of French and Italian to arrange to take our 3015 Equivalency Exam.

The French 3015 Equivalency Exam is administered by the Department of French and Italian at no fee to students who have passed the LPE and think they may not need French 3015. It is a 90-minute written exam testing mastery of the grammar covered in 3015 (by means of fill-in-the-blank and translation questions) and completed by a short essay. To arrange to take the exam, which can be administered anytime during the hours when the Main Office is open, please contact the Department of French and Italian.

For very advanced students, a similar exam exists for French 3016, the last of our required grammar and writing courses.

Native speakers who attended high school in French do not need to take any placement exam. They should contact the DUS in French to obtain a permission number to register for French 3101W.

Transfer and Study Abroad Credits

For credit transfer to the University of Minnesota, please contact your college advising office. For upper division credit transfer (3xxx-level courses) towards a minor or major, contact the main office (French) frit@umn.edu or Susanna Ferlito (Italian) ferli001@umn.edu.

To use credits earned at another institution in the United States or internationally (including study abroad programs) toward your major or minor, you must complete procedures at both college and department levels:

1.  At the college level, you must make arrangements for the credits to appear on your University of Minnesota transcript.

  • The Office of the Registrar manages the process for credit transferred from other U.S. institutions.
  • The Office of Admissions is responsible for credit transferred from international institutions.
  • If you studied abroad while enrolled at the University of Minnesota, the Learning Abroad Center coordinates the transfer of credit for courses taken abroad. These credits should appear on your transcript a reasonable period of time after your return.

2.  At the department level, you must see the program advisor to request that transfer courses be used as the equivalent of major or minor requirements. You should arrange a meeting with the appropriate adviser as soon as possible after the outside courses appear on your U of M transcript.

French & Italian Culture

Culture Shock Blog

Contact Information

Lower Division Language Programs

Patricia Mougel
Director of Language Instruction (French)
Folwell 314-L

Carlotta Dradi-Bower
Director of Language Instruction (Italian)
Folwell 314-G

Upper Division Majors and Minors

Professor Betsy Kerr
Dir. of Undergraduate Studies (French)
French Studies and French & Italian Studies Advisor
Folwell 304-F

Professor Susanna Ferlito
Dir. of Undergraduate Studies (Italian)
Italian Studies Advisor
Folwell 304-G

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